Hopscotch Translation Contributors

Elisa Wouk Almino is a writer, editor, and literary translator based in Los Angeles. She is the translator of This House by Ana Martins Marques (Scrambler Books), editor of Alice Trumbull Mason: Pioneer of American Abstraction (Rizzoli), and a senior editor at the online art magazine Hyperallergic. Her translations and essays have appeared in the Paris Review Daily, Lit Hub, NYR Daily, Asymptote Journal, Words Without Borders, and other places. She teaches literary translation and art writing at Catapult and UCLA Extension.


Renée Altergott is a PhD candidate in French and Francophone Literature at Princeton University. Her work focuses on the cultural history of sound recording in France and the former French Colonial Empire. She has translated works of nonfiction by Jean During and Jacqueline Cerquiglini-Toulet. 


Liyanage Amarakeerthi is a contemporary Sri Lankan writer. He is the author of eight collections of short stories, five novels, and two collections of poetry. He is also a writer of two children’s books, six academic books, and ten translations into Sinhalese. His novel Atawaka Puththu (Half-moon Sons) won the Best Sinhala Novel award at the 2008 State Literary Festival. He is also the recipient of the National Award for Literature in 2000, Swarna Pusthaka Awards in 2014 and 2016, and the Vidyodaya Literary Award in 2014 for his fiction and prose works.


Erik Beranek is a writer and translator based in Philadelphia. He has translated works by Jacques Rancière, Étienne Souriau, Michel Foucault, and David Lapoujade. He works at the University of Pennsylvania Press.


Sarah Booker is a literary translator and doctoral candidate in Hispanic Literature at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, where she studies contemporary Latin American narrative and translation studies. She has translated texts by Cristina Rivera Garza and Mónica Ojeda, among others.


David Boyd is Assistant Professor of Japanese at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He has translated novels and stories by Hiroko Oyamada, Hideo Furukawa, and Toh EnJoe, among others. With Sam Bett, he is co-translating the novels of Mieko Kawakami.


Chris Clarke is a literary translator and scholar currently based in Philadelphia, where he teaches French. His translations include work by Raymond Queneau, Ryad Girod, and Éric Chevillard. His translation of Marcel Schwob’s Imaginary Lives was awarded the French-American Foundation Translation Prize for Fiction in 2019, and his translation of Nobel Prize winner Patrick Modiano’s In the Café of Lost Youth was a finalist for the same award in 2017.


Alexander Dickow is a poet, novelist, and scholar in French and English. He grew up in Moscow, Idaho. His forthcoming translations include Sylvie Kandé’s Neverending Quest for the Other Shore (Wesleyan UP), Henri Droguet’s Showers and Bright Spells (Spuyten Duyvil), and Max Jacob’s Central Laboratory (Wakefield Press). Recent creative works include Déblais (Louise Bottu, 2021) and Le Premier Souper (La Volte, 2021).


Magdalena Edwards writes the Translationships column for Hopscotch. Her translations include the work of Noemi Jaffe, Clarice Lispector, Silviano Santiago, Márcia Tiburi, Óscar Contardo, Nicanor Parra, and Raúl Zurita. She is currently translating Julio Cortázar’s Cartas de mamá for Sublunary Press. Find her on Twitter @magda8lena & Instagram @msmagda8lena. 


Don English is a writer and legal aid worker. His work has been published in the Vancouver Courier, Poetry is Dead, Medium, and most recently in Akashic Books’ Vancouver Noir anthology. He lives in East Vancouver, British Columbia, with a view of the docks.


Volha  Hapeyeva (Вольга Гапеева) is a Belarusian poet, writer, thinker, translator, and linguist, whose work has been translated into more than ten languages. She has won several literary prizes in Belarus and has received international residency scholarships in Austria, Germany, and Latvia. She is the author of numerous books, including Граматыка снегу (The Grammar of Snow), Няголены ранак (The Unshaven Morning), Сумны суп (Sad Soup), and (В)ядомыя гісторыі ({Inc}readible stories). In My Garden of Mutants, a collection of her work in English translation, is due out with Arc Publications in February 2021.


Ainee Jeong is a translator and freelance book designer. She completed her MA in English with a Certificate in Literary Translation at the University of Connecticut. Her translations of Korean kisaeng poetry are published or forthcoming in Modern Poetry in Translation and The Hudson Review.


Vincent Kling is a professor of German and comparative literature at La Salle University. He has published translations of works by Gert Jonke, Heimito von Doderer, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Gerhard Fritsch, Werner Kofler, and Aglaja Veteranyi. His translation of Veteranyi’s novel Why the Child Is Cooking in the Polenta was awarded the Schlegel-Tieck Prize in 2013. New York Review Books will publish his translation of Doderer’s The Strudlhof Steps in 2021.


Chamini Kulathunga is a Sri Lankan translator. She is a graduate of the Iowa Translation Workshop and a summer visiting fellow at Cornell University’s South Asia Program. Chamini was the former Blog Editor and a staff editor of Exchanges: Journal of Literary Translation and is Asymptote’s Editor-at-Large for Sri Lanka. Her writings, interviews, and translations have appeared in Asymptote, Los Angeles Review of Books, Los Angeles Review, Project Plume, Exchanges, DoubleSpeak, Bengaluru Review, and elsewhere.


Patrícia Lino (Portugal, 1990) is a poet and Assistant Professor of Luso-Brazilian Literatures and cinema at UCLA and the author of O Kit de Sobrevivência do Descobridor Português no Mundo Anticolonial (2020), Não é isto um livro (2020), and Manoel de Barros e A Poesia Cínica (2019). She recently directed Anticorpo. A Parody of the Laughable Empire (US 2019; Brazil 2020) and Vibrant Hands (2019).


Olivia Lott is the translator of Lucía Estrada’s Katabasis (2020, Eulalia Books), which is a finalist for the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. She is an Olin Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate in Hispanic Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where she is writing a dissertation on translation, revolution, and 1960s neo-avant-garde poetics in Latin America.


Samuel Martin teaches French at the University of Pennsylvania. He has translated works by several contemporary writers including Jean-Christophe Bailly and Georges Didi-Huberman; his translation of Didi-Huberman’s Bark was a co-winner of the French-American Foundation Translation Prize and was longlisted for the PEN Translation Prize. 


Lily Meyer is a writer, translator, and critic from Washington, D.C. Her short translations have appeared in the Brooklyn RailContra VientoElectric LiteratureJoylandLatin American Literature TodayMAKE, and Tin House. She is a Ph.D. candidate in fiction at the University of Cincinnati. Little Bird is her first full-length translation.


Juan Agustín Mucci is a teacher and amateur translator based in La Plata, Argentina. He is Licenciado en Letras from the Universidad Nacional de La Plata and has been awarded a national scholarship to facilitate the writing of his doctoral dissertation, which focuses on fiction and translation in the Río de la Plata region in the 20th century.


Violeta Percia is an Argentine poet, audiovisual artist, and writer. She is a researcher and professor in the BA literature program and MA comparative literature program of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, currently her work centers on the theory of poetic language, in direct dialogue with the history of documentary images, interculturality, and translation. She coedited Traducir poesía (2014). Translated, edited, and wrote the prologue for Ideorrealidades (2013) by Saint-Pol-Roux and El narcisismo del arte contemporáneo by A. Troyas and V. Arrault (2020), among others. She wrote the novel Como nubes (2021), and the poetry collections Clínica enferma (2003) and Poesía del Tanti Rao (2019).


Allison Markin Powell has been awarded grants from English PEN and the NEA, and the 2020 PEN America Translation Prize for The Ten Loves of Nishino by Hiromi Kawakaami. Her other translations include works by Osamu Dazai, Kanako Nishi, and Fuminori Nakamura. She was the co-organizer and co-host of the “Translating the Future” conference, served as cochair of the PEN America Translation Committee and currently represents the committee on PEN’s Board of Trustees, and she maintains the database Japanese Literature in English.


Emma Ramadan is a literary translator based in Providence, RI, where she also co-owns Riffraff bookstore and bar. Her recent translations include Kamel Daoud’s Zabor, or the Psalms and Abdellah Taïa’s A Country for Dying.


Matt Reeck is a translator, poet, and scholar. He won the 2020 Albertine Prize for his translation of Zahia Rahmani’s “Muslim”: A Novel. He has won fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the PEN/Heim Translation Fund, and during Spring 2021, he served as the Princeton University Translator in Residence. He has published seven translations from the French, Urdu, and Hindi.


Trask Roberts, currently based in Paris, is a Ph.D. candidate in French and Francophone studies at the University of Pennsylvania and is interested in all things translation. Find him on twitter @roberts_trask.


Annie Rutherford champions poetry and translated literature, both through her work at StAnza, Scotland’s international poetry festival, and as a writer and translator. In My Garden of Mutants, a dual-language pamphlet of her translations of Volha Hapeyeva, is due out with Arc Publications in February 2021. She also translates Nora Gomringer, Isabel Bogdan, Annette von Droste-Hülshoff and Kinga Toth.


Kit Schluter (Boston, 1989) is author of Pierrot’s Fingernails (Canarium Books) and translator of Rafael Bernal’s His Name Was Death (New Directions Publishing, forthcoming), Olivia Tapiero’s Phototaxis (Nightboat Books, forthcoming), and multiple books of fiction by Marcel Schwob (Wakefield Press). He lives in Mexico City. [Image: Portrait of Kit Schluter by Félix Vallotton]


Timea Sipos is a Hungarian-American writer, poet, and translator with an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her writing appears in Prairie Schooner, Passages North, Juked, and elsewhere. Her translations appear in The Washington Square Review, The Offing, Asymptote, Two Lines, among others. She has received support from the MacDowell Colony, the Vermont Studio Center, Tin House, and elsewhere. Learn more about the online translation workshops she offers at timea-sipos.com.


Elisa Taber is a writer, literary translator, and PhD candidate at McGill University, living between Buenos Aires and Montreal. She is the author of An Archipelago in a Landlocked Country (11:11 Press), and translator of Horacio Quiroga’s Beyond (Sublunary Editions) and Miguelángel Meza’s Pyambu (Dream Pattering Feet) (Ugly Duckling Presse), forthcoming. Elisa is also Co-Editor of SLUG and Editor at Large at Seven Stories Press.


Flora Thomson-DeVeaux is a writer and translator, most recently of The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas, and director of research at Rádio Novelo. She lives in Rio de Janeiro.


Sevinç Türkkan teaches comparative literature and translation studies at Oberlin College. Her translation of The Stone Building and Other Places by the Turkish writer, journalist, and human rights activist Aslı Erdoğan was a finalist for the 2019 PEN Translation Prize.


photo of the author

Lara Vergnaud is a translator of prose, creative nonfiction, and scholarly works from the French. She is the recipient of two PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grants and a French Voices Grand Prize, and has been nominated for the National Translation Award. She lives in Washington, D.C. 


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